Non corticosteroid drugs

The growth of children and adolescents receiving orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, should be monitored routinely (., via stadiometry). If a child or adolescent on any corticosteroid appears to have growth suppression, the possibility that he/she is particularly sensitive to this effect should be considered. The potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the risks associated with alternative therapies. To minimize the systemic effects of orally inhaled corticosteroids, including QVAR, each patient should be titrated to his/her lowest effective dose [see Dosage and Administration ( )] .

Stopping corticosteroid therapy
In autoimmune disease, clear end-points should be set before starting therapy. Corticosteroids may improve mood and give patients a feeling of general well-being unrelated to the effect on the disease being treated. Subjective assessments can therefore be misleading. Objective clinical parameters should be used to monitor the need for continuing or restarting therapy . proteinuria in nephritis, spirometry in asthma and creatinine kinase in myositis. Therapy should be tapered off. For example, with prednis(ol)one, the dose is reduced in steps of -5 mg every 3-7 days down to 15 mg/day. At that point, switch to alternate day therapy and reduce in mg steps over 2-3 weeks. This minimises the impact on mood and lessens the drop in general well-being.

Certain drugs such as troleandomycin (TAO), erythromycin ( Ery-Tab , EryPed 200), and clarithromycin ( Biaxin ) and ketoconazole ( Nizoral ) can reduce the ability of the liver to metabolize (breakdown) corticosteroids and this may lead to an increase in the levels and side effects of corticosteroids in the body. On the other hand, phenobarbital, ephedrine , phenytoin ( Dilantin ), and rifampin ( Rifadin , Rimactane ) may reduce the blood levels of corticosteroids by increasing the breakdown of corticosteroids by the liver. This may necessitate an increase of corticosteroid dose when they are used in combination with these drugs.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, The . Congress and various health care insurance providers have also recognized the authority of AHFS content as a source of information on the medically accepted uses of drugs. Monographs include recommendations of numerous authorities, including the . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Heart Association, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, the Women's Health Initiative, and many others. The publication also features major cautionary information from FDA MedWatch notices , as well as new and updated scientific findings.

Non corticosteroid drugs

non corticosteroid drugs

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, The . Congress and various health care insurance providers have also recognized the authority of AHFS content as a source of information on the medically accepted uses of drugs. Monographs include recommendations of numerous authorities, including the . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American Heart Association, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, the Women's Health Initiative, and many others. The publication also features major cautionary information from FDA MedWatch notices , as well as new and updated scientific findings.

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